Browsing articles tagged with " Everglades"
Nov 14, 2017
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About Florida Bay, exhibit + panel (2017)

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Panel discussion ‘Issues surrounding About Florida Bay’ Left to right: Naturalist Steven Tennis; Interpretive Park Ranger Leon Howell; Dana Wildsmith; Valerie LeBlanc; Daniel H. Dugas; Nathaniel Sandler; Houston Cypress; Jason Hedges; Nick Gilmore. Not seen: Jason Hedges.

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On view at AIRIE Nest Gallery from October 1, 2017 – January 15, 2018: About Florida Bay, featuring work by Houston Cypress / Mark Dion / Valerie George / Nick Gilmore / Jason Hedges / Valerie LeBlanc and Daniel H. Dugas / Nathaniel Sandler / Magnus Sodamin

About Florida Bay: 95% of Florida Bay is located in the Everglades National Park, and has undergone a series of ecological changes that have severely altered the natural ecosystem. To support the state’s agricultural water needs, the water was rerouted and no longer flows into the Bay, causing severe environmental issues and loss of native wildlife. About Florida Bay is a group exhibition in response to the unpredictability of this environmental dilemma, in which nine artists strive to capture the historical significance of this contested area while also featuring a sense of nostalgia and raising concerns about the future.

In addition to new work form our artists, this exhibition contains archival photographs are on loan courtesy of the South Florida Collections Management Center. In a unique partnership with AIRIE, Miccosukee Reverend Houston Cypress of Love the Everglades Movement presents sacred waters borrowed from the water cycle. Gladesman Glen Simmons’ photographs, notebook and carving generously provided by anthropologist Laura Ogden and specimens courtesy of Deborah Mitchell.

About Florida Bay is curated by Deborah Mitchell, artist and Executive Director, AIRIE, Inc. About Florida Bay is the third exhibition held in the newly renovated AIRIE Nest, made possible by a grant from the Knight Arts Challenge. AIRIE programming is also supported by a Culture Builds Florida grant and by a Hannibal Cox grant from Miami-Dade County.Works contained in this exhibition do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the National Park Service.

Opening reception and informal tours are offered on Sunday, October 8th, 1-3pm

Sundays in the Park ecology discussion and sculpting workshop Sunday, October 22, 1-3pm

All events are free and open to the public, open daily from 9-5pm

Mar 2, 2016
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FLOW – Launch (2016)

FLOW: BIG WATERS by Valerie LeBlanc and Daniel H. Dugas – Soundmap launch today.

12 soundworks inspired by geographic locations within the Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve and surrounding regions of South Florida and featuring the voices of Rebecca Rideout and Mark McPhee are available for listening.

http://flow.basicbruegel.com/soundmap/

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Feb 26, 2015
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Deux artistes acadiens en Floride (2015)

Acadie Nouvelle
25 février 2015

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Nov 23, 2014
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AIRIE Panel @ MBFI (2014)

AIRIE Panel at Miami Book Fair International Highlights the Value of the Everglades

By Abel Folgar
Published Mon., Nov. 17 2014 at 8:05 AM

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Courtesy of AIRIE LeBlanc and Dugas

For the last 14 years, the Artists in Residence in Everglades (AIRIE) has strengthened the bonds between science and art as a means of creating awareness and insuring the survival of the Everglades — a unique and delicate ecosystem that is unique and should be of utmost concern for all Floridians. Over the years, AIRIE has faced the same problems that routinely plague nonprofits but has continued to attract cutting-edge, contemporary artists to “mingle” with the Park’s scientific staff and create new works based solely on their experience in the residency.

Artist and Executive Director of AIRIE Deborah Mitchell will moderate a panel — Science + Art: Transformative Experiences in the Everglades — with an introduction by retired biologist Skip Snow, composed of the latest batch of artists who took up home in our beloved “swamp.” This diverse and multi-disciplined group of artists include Gustavo Matamoros, Valerie LeBlanc, Daniel Dugas, McCrary Sullivan and Van Brunschot regarding their work within the fragile ecosystem. Local historian Dr. Paul George will review the historical aspects of the Everglades.

We had a chance to speak with Mitchell about the program, its vision and what the future holds for the science and arts partnership in the Everglades.

See also: The Ten Best Things to Do at Miami Book Fair International 

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Courtesy of Deborah Mitchell

New Times: The Everglades are a unique ecosystem, the only one of its kind in the world. Why do you think it’s the immediate neighbors who are the most ignorant on its significance and importance to the well-being of Florida’s ecology?

Deborah Mitchell: The health and well-being of Florida’s ecology lies in the abundance of fresh, clean water. This complex issue often eludes the interest of the general public for many reasons, due largely to the misunderstanding of critical issues. Policy and legislation on the restoration is often challenging to comprehend, and on a more basic level most people don’t know much about the Biscayne Aquifer.

Think about the significance of our consumption in terms of drinking water, agriculture, tourism, and commercial fishing. It is almost impossible to measure the economic benefits of how we manage this critical resource.

What has been AIRIE’s biggest concern since its founding?

A huge challenge for AIRIE during 14 years of operation has been funding, as is the case with most nonprofits. Our budget operates in large part due to generous support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Tauk-Romano Innovative Philanthropy, community grants, and small, grass- roots fundraisers. The Board of Directors has recently expanded to include a high caliber of individuals, whose professional experience and visionary ideas will push the program forward. We have really rolled up our sleeves to increase exposure, hoping an endowment will assist us with maintaining a steady operating budget to fund our next set of goals.

You participated in an Artist-in-Residence program at Big Cypress back in 2007, what experiences there were you able to translate into working in the Everglades environment?

AIRIE is unique in that it has always been operated by artists; first by Donna Marxer in 2001, then by Christy Gast in 2009. We understand the needs of highly creative people and try to anticipate their needs, such as pre-arranging visits to the South Florida Collections Management Center for in-depth research. My experiences in Big Cypress continue to be intensely rewarding. Every summer I still venture out looking for ghost orchids with my friends and hike with my family in the winter. It is an honor to take AIRIE artists out in the field to meet with the locals, hike in the backcountry or kayak the Turner River in Big Cypress.

After all, the concerns of the Preserve and the Park are both centered around the flow of clean water from Lake Okeechobee southwards for our growing urban population. It is through cultural outreach events and programming that we expose the public to the interpretations of artists who have had the privilege of immersion in this subtropical wilderness. This will lead to a greater understanding of how vital it is to protect and preserve our precious natural resources.

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Courtesy of AIRIE/Reed Van Brunschot

What has been the biggest impact of the program on the park?
In recent decades, artists have utilized the latest advances in science. The immense popularity of the new book Colliding Worlds, How Cutting Edge Science is Redefining Contemporary Art by Arthur Miller, proves that there is growing interest in the connection between the two fields. Enrollment in STEAM-related classes has increased, too. On March 4 at the University of Miami CAS Gallery, select AIRIE fellows will (together with local artists and scientists) lead a workshop and exhibition entitled AnthropoScene: Art and Nature in a Manufactured Era. When these types of partnerships emerge within our community, increased attendance and awareness of environmental issues impact the Park in a positive manner.

What type of artist is attracted to work in the Everglades and what can the park give said artist in return?
AIRIE receives applications from artists working in all disciplines who are seeking time to work unfettered by the demands of today’s fast paced world. The allure of the Everglades attracts artists who recognize this unique biosphere as a place so awe inspiring that it creates a stillness within. By achieving this personal transformation, an artist becomes free to process the experience and create new work in the AIRIELAB, our live/work space provided by the Park. The Park makes introductions between AIRIE Fellows and Park staff, assists with events, provides gear like bikes/kayaks, gets artists into the back country by letting them shadow scientists, and advises on the application proposals.

What can be expected from the panelists and how their diverse mediums have been affected by the park?
The Swamp panelists will be discussing how science and art can inspire transformative experiences in the wilderness. The diversity of mediums represented will ensure that there is something valuable for everyone’s tastes. We are absolutely thrilled to debut videos of Canadian team Daniel Dugas and Valerie LeBlanc entitled FLOW – BIG WATERS. In July 2014, this talented Canadian team worked in collaboration on the project in the Park recording and researching several aspects of this special biosphere. They are currently producing soundwalks to be made accessible to Park visitors online next year. Reed Van Brunschot, Gustavo Matamoros, and Anne McCrary Sullivan will also present and discuss their dynamic new work.

Overall, what do you want folks who learn about the program to come away with and what is the next step for AIRIE?
We hope to inspire people to get out and explore our wild peninsula, meet the artists, and think about how our short and long-term actions will affect the future generations. AIRIE is ready to increase its visibility and expand to a very strong and healthy organization. Come out and meet us at AIRIE in the Garden on January 24 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Pinecrest Gardens for our annual benefit! We will have live performances and readings featuring several artists from the 2014-15 program.

An Evening with AIRIE (Artists in Residence in Everglades) at Miami Book Fair International on Tuesday, November 18, at 7 p.m. at the Swamp Pavilion. Look for the big tent at the southeast corner of NE Third Street and Second Avenue. Call 305-237-3258 or visit miamibookfair.com.

Follow Cultist on Facebook and Twitter @CultistMiami.

Miami New Times : AIRIE Panel at Miami Book Fair International Highlights the Value of the Everglades

 

Nov 6, 2014
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Miami Book Fair International (2014)

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An Evening with AIRIE (Artists in Residence in Everglades)

Miami Bookfair International 2014

Tuesday, November 18th @ 7pm at The Swamp Pavillion

Look for the big tent at the southeast corner of N.E. 3rd Street and 2nd Avenue.

Science + Art:  Transformative Experiences in the Everglades

Despite its importance, abundance of wildlife, and great natural beauty, many people have never visited  the Everglades and only have a vague idea of it as a tangled swamp rife with pythons, mosquitoes and alligators.  AIRIE executive director and artist Deborah Mitchell and biologist Skip Snow will co-moderate a panel of five AIRIE artists on the transformative experience their residency in the Everglades has had on their work.  Audio composer Gustavo Matamoros, Visual artist Reed Van Brunschot, author Anne McCrary Sullivan, and multi-disciplinary Canadian artists Valerie LeBlanc and Daniel Dugas will share their recent experiences with the audience while a slide show of AIRIE art provides visual support for their moving narratives.

About the artists

LeBlanc and Dugas will debut their new project FLOW- BIG WATERS with a program of video poems. Based upon their research in the Everglades National Park, the project will continue through 2015 and will also include a series of sound walks and photographs. Researching and recording several aspects of this unique biosphere, this dynamic duo continues working on various aspects of this multi-facetted project. Using tools of writing, still and moving images and audio, the root of their desire is to share the aesthetic joy of being there in the moment. When completed, the project will be available online.

Matamoros will present Bats & Insects, a sound-scape audio composition on exhibit September 19-November 5th at the critically acclaimed Common Ground:  Artists in the Everglades at Florida Atlantic University. This Venezuelan composer is the driving force behind ISaw + Subtropics, the leading proponent of experiential music and sound art in the Southeast.

McCrary Sullivan has had poems widely published in literary and academic journals including The Gettysburg Review, the Southern Review, and Harvard Educational Review.  During and after her AIRIE residency, she accumulated thousands of hours paddling the waters of the Everglades National Park, which resulted in two books:   Ecology II: Throat Song from the Everglades and Paddling the Everglades Wilderness Waterway.

Van Brunschot is a visual artist who uses multiple mediums including sculpture, painting, performance and video.   Based on evoking memories of childhood, home life and a general commonality found in nostalgic experiences, her work examines transitions and places them in the public sphere.  Van Brunschot will discuss how her recent transformative residency experience has affected her studio practice.

About the Moderators

Biologist Skip Snow worked for the National Park Service for 38 years, the last 25 at Everglades National Park. He has evaluated the effects of water management on park wildlife, worked to reintroduce native species, and spent considerable time working on eradicating the Burmese python.  Since retiring in 2013, Skip has been pursuing a keen interest in the intersection of art and science, and continues to volunteer for the park as an emeritus wildlife biologist.

Artist and Executive Director of AIRIE, Deborah Mitchell, participated in the Artist-in-Residence program in Big Cypress in 2007.  Since then, environmental awareness and community outreach has been the focus of her multi-disciplinary work.  In addition to working with AIRIE fellows and organizing cultural programs, she curated The Preserve in 2012 and Flight: Aloft in the Everglades in 2014. Mitchell’s photographs can be seen in Swamplife, (Minnesota Press).

An evening with AIRIE in the Swamp Pavilion at the Bookfair will be an informative program which presents a nuanced look at the Everglades by letting AIRIE Fellows share their work and perspectives on the park with both local and international book lovers.

http://airie.org/2014/save-the-date-airie-at-the-book-fair-nov-18/

Aug 3, 2014
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Everglades reverberations (2014)

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The following writeup was originally published on the Knight Arts website on July 25th 2014

By Daniel Dugas and Valerie LeBlanc, AIRIE

We came from the north. As we approached Miami, the pilot said something about the weather while swerving to miss storm cells. A few hours later, after we had landed, the downpour started in earnest. The rain was heavy, the sky black. It was a big storm; actually it was the first tropical storm of the 2014 Atlantic Hurricane season. It later strengthened to become Hurricane Arthur and it was tracking northward. Hurricanes often follow the Gulf Stream current and affect the Maritime region of Canada where we live. But this one was going for the jugular; our town was right in the middle of its path. There were a slew of warnings posted on the Environment Canada website, tropical storm, rainfall, wind, special weather statement, and a tropical cyclone information statement. We followed the evolution of Arthur and worried for our house. At the last moment the storm veered left and the town where we live got a good soaking but not the anticipated deluge. It was pretty amazing to arrive in Florida just in time to witness the birth of a storm that slowly moved northward to die almost outside of our doorstep. It was a reminder of the interconnectedness of all things.

1-HURRICANE-ARTHURHurricane Arthur, July 5, 2014, National Hurricane Center

We are here to do a soundwalk project; fictional stories, voices, swamp recordings. It is this concept of interconnectness that is calling for our attention. We are looking at the connections between: the Everglades National Park geography and its inhabitants; those living close to its borders; and those, like ourselves, who come here to commune with the environment. We recognize that ecologically speaking, our understanding and experience of the Everglades is a relatively short moment in time. As we research through the networks and components that is the Everglades, we try to understand something of where it all sits in the grand scheme of things.

Upon arriving, the first thing that we did was to try to visualize the park, to construct a mental chart of what exists where. In the first few days we covered as much ground as we could, recording ambient sound, the weather, and the insects. The mosquitos hit the shotgun mic with anger. We saw sunrises, sunsets, walked in the warm waters of the slough at Pa-Hay-Okee, attempted to hike among the mangroves at Christian Point Trail, immersed ourselves in the song of crickets, frogs, of rustling in the bush, of movement in the trees.

Daniel, ChokoloskeeDaniel, Chokoloskee

The type of collaboration that we do is diverse. We have been collaborating for over twenty years on many projects. Often we work within a framework that allows for individual sensitivities to bubble to the surface, this is the case with our Everglades project. As we go out on hikes and explorations we experience the same location but from two different perspectives. Our individual takes are like stones thrown into a lake; the ripples of both, the points on intersections lie where the waves combine. That is often the place of creation.

Soon after arriving, we realized that we were in a world of layers. That we would have to see through the mosquito layer, the mosquito net layer, the humidity layer, the heat stress layer and the DEET layer. Every task becomes monumental, every clap of thunder, every raindrop intensifies, maximizes the experience.

We quickly learned to operate in the environment, to be there. Because audio recording demands silence and stillness, it is an obvious target for the hordes of skitters. In the spirit of adaptation, Valerie developed a Tai-Chi-like series of movements to repel them away from the microphone pickup area. This slow motioned waving of blue rubber gloved hands became the symbol of a certain level of peace.

Valerie’s Tai-Chi-like series of movements, Pa-Hay-OkeeValerie’s Tai-Chi-like series of movements, Pa-Hay-Okee

Of all the layers present within the Park, it is the human presence that has become the focus of our work. Whether it is the recently abandoned Chekika Day Use Area, the HM69 Nike Missile Base,

Valerie and Daniel, HM69 Nike Missile BaseValerie and Daniel, HM69 Nike Missile Base

the shell mounds of the Calusa Indians on Sandfly Island or the Deer Pen ruins near Paradise Key, all of these traces reveal something about human interventions in this place. Trace elements become covered, overgrown, eaten or corroded as plants, animals and climate reclaim. Sites can be seen as momento mori, reminders of mortality, but they are also reverberations of life.

Deer Pen, Paradise Key, NPS archives July, 1934Deer Pen, Paradise Key, NPS archives July, 1934
Deer Pen, July 2014, left to right: Daniel Dugas; Hillary Cooley Botanist, Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Parks and Valerie LeBlancDeer Pen, July 2014, left to right: Daniel Dugas; Hillary Cooley, Botanist, Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Parks and Valerie LeBlanc

Sep 30, 2013
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Announcing 2014 AIRIE Fellows

Valerie LeBlanc and myself are extremely happy to have been invited by the Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Park to be the artists in residence for July 2014.  It is a prestigious opportunity and referring to the tradition of invited artists, as stated in the 1st paragraph of the letter, ‘our work there will become part of the permanent record of the parks that helps to preserve them’.  Described as a subtropical wilderness, with a unique combination of temperate and tropical characteristics, the Everglades has been designated as a World Heritage Site, an International Biosphere reserve, and a Wetland of International Importance.  One of the main outcomes that the Park hopes to gain from the visiting artists is ‘to help visitors make emotional and intellectual connections with this amazing place’.  As per our practice(s), we are looking forward to continuing to create poetic storylines within the exploration of this new media locative soundwalk project.

 

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Artists in Residence in Everglades proudly announces the 2014 AIRIE Fellows. This year, AIRIE boasts a creative group of local, national and international artists across several disciplines including painters, installation artists, new media artists, photographers, and writers, who will live and work in the Everglades for a month at a time.

 

2014 AIRIE Fellows include photographers Adam Nadel and Dana Levy, poet Breanna Dixon, painter Rodney Dickson, video artists Karl Staven and duo Daniel Dugas & Valerie LeBlanc, as well as Florida natives including multi-disciplinary artist Elite Kedan, photographer Emily Myerscough, visual artist Reed Van BrunschotRegina Jestrow and Prudence Gill and writer Nathaniel Sandler. Read more about each of the AIRIE 2014 fellows.

 

South Florida is home to the only subtropical wilderness area in the country, AIRIE is the only program bringing artists to the Everglades. AIRIE’s purpose is to inform, connect, and support artists, writers and musicians who wish to be inspired by the Everglades and then become ambassadors for the Park and its resources. AIRIE partners with Everglades National Park staff to offer month-long artist residencies in the Park’s subtropical wilderness. At least twelve AIRIE Fellows per year live and create new work in the Park, and in return lead interactive activities with visitors and donate artwork to the Park.

 

With generous support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Arts Challenge Grant, AIRIE connects Fellows with the South Florida cultural community to bring attention to this unique and endangered part of our national heritage. AIRIE’s expanded programming will feature a year-round calendar of events both in the Everglades and outside the Park, including readings, performances, workshops and lectures. Through these outreach events, Fellows will use their art forms to engage the public, showcasing the Everglades as inspiring, important and worth protecting.

 

AIRIE Fellows have the unique opportunity to get to know the ecology of the Everglades by being immersed in it, and then share their perspective through creative public programs. “In a park known for its spectacular and diverse wildlife, the art and voices of AIRIE artists reveal other unique, and often missed, dimensions of this special place,” remarks Park Superintendent Dan Kimball.

from: http://airie.org/2013/announcing-2014-airie-fellow/

 

Daniel H. Dugas

Artiste numérique, poète et musicien, Daniel Dugas a participé à des expositions individuelles et de groupe ainsi qu’à plusieurs festivals et événements de poésie en Amérique du Nord, en Europe, au Mexique et en Australie. Son neuvième recueil de poésie L’esprit du temps / The Spirit of the Time vient de paraître aux Éditions Prise de parole.

Daniel Dugas is a poet, musician and videographer. He has participated in solo and group exhibitions as well as festivals and literary events in North America, Europe, Mexico and Australia. His ninth book of poetry: L’esprit du temps / The Spirit of the Time has just been published by Les Éditions Prise de parole.

Daniel Dugas es poeta, músico y videocreador. Ha participado en exposiciones individuales y colectivas, festivals y eventos literarios en Norteamérica, Europa, México y Australia. Acaba de publicar su noveno poemario, L’esprit du temps / The spirit of time (Les Editions Prise de parole).

L’esprit du temps / The Spirit of the Time est un projet de transmutation du paysage publicitaire en paysage poétique. Ce livre est à la fois un livre de photographie, un recueil de poésie et un essai lucide mais ludique sur notre société matérialiste. Il a été produit en numérique et imprimé en quantité limitée.

Date : Décembre 2015
Genre : Poésie
Collection : Poésie
ISBN : 9782894239629

Éditions Prise de parole

http://www.prisedeparole.ca/auteurs/?id=148

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