Apr 19, 2018
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Common Interest (2018)

medals

Commonwealth Games: medal table for Gold Coast 2018: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/ng-interactive/2018/apr/05/commonwealth-games-medal-table-for-gold-coast-2018

 

Looking at the results of the recent Commonwealth Games, I don’t know if I should be amazed, shocked, or outraged by the medal count. For example, Australia, a country of almost 25 million people, got three times more medals than India, a country of 1 billion, 300 million people. In other words, India, a country with a population 52 times bigger than Australia finished the Games with 132 fewer medals than Australia. One might conclude that the athletes from Australia are either born with superpowers, an impossible and racist conjecture or else there is a political will and economic policies to sustain and elevate levels of athletic prowess Down Under. The gap between winners and non-winners begins to look like a canyon with the seven nations of Australia, England, Canada, New Zealand, Wales Scotland, North Ireland and the Isle of Man winning a total of 565 medals. The other sixty-four participant nations took away 234 medals, that count includes the total medals won by the sum of participating African nations.

If the Commonwealth is the traditional English descriptor for a political community founded for the common good, I wonder what is the common wealth at play here. It is certainly not embodied in the haul of medals that are awarded to the best of the best. What we are seeing in competitions like the Commonwealth Games, even more so than in the Olympic Games, is a visualization of international inequalities.

When we talk about fair games, the usual common topic is anti-doping criteria. There are clean and not-so-clean participants, but chemical enhancements are not the only kinds of boosts that can propel your average sprinter. Wealth is a marker that could be used to identify the possible ability, success, and/or failure of a participant or nation. Perhaps the Gini index which looks at wealth distribution of a nation’s residents to measure inequalities could be tailored to test athletes, not for prohibited chemical enhancements, but to quantify economic advantage.

See also:
DEMOS / The Racial Wealth Gap: Why Policy Matters
http://www.demos.org/publication/racial-wealth-gap-why-policy-matters
Handicap (golf)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handicap_(golf)

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Daniel H. Dugas

Artiste numérique, poète et musicien, Daniel H. Dugas a participé à des expositions individuelles et de groupe ainsi qu’à plusieurs festivals et événements de poésie en Amérique du Nord, en Europe, au Mexique et en Australie. Everglades, coécrit avec Valerie LeBlanc, vient de paraître aux Éditions Prise de parole.

Daniel H. Dugas is a poet, musician, and videographer. He has participated in solo and group exhibitions as well as festivals and literary events in North America, Europe, Mexico and Australia. His tenth book of poetry, co-written with Valerie LeBlanc, Everglades has just been published by Les Éditions Prise de parole.

Everglades
À partir de leur exploration du parc national des Everglades, Daniel H. Dugas et Valerie LeBlanc cartographient dans cet essai poétique les effets de la présence humaine sur le milieu naturel, les traces qu’elle y dépose. Everglades est une ode à la beauté, à la fragilité et à la résilience d’une nature aux prises avec une espèce envahissante, la nôtre.

Everglades
Through their exploration of the Everglades National Park, Daniel H. Dugas and Valerie LeBlanc document, in this poetic collection, the effects of human presence in the natural world and the traces left behind. Everglades is an ode to the beauty, the fragility and the resilience of nature faced with the invasiveness of a particular species, ours.

Date : Mars 2018
Genre : Poésie
Collection : Poésie
ISBN : 9782897441029
Français/English

Éditions Prise de parole

http://www.prisedeparole.ca/auteurs/?id=1148

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